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VOLUME 9 , ISSUE 3 ( September-December, 2015 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Dentition Status, Periodontal Status, Dentofacial Anomalies and Treatment Needs Among Differently Abled Children in Chennai

Preetha Elizabeth Chaly, S Srinidhi, S Vaishnavi, P Shalini, V Indra Priyadarshni

Citation Information : Chaly PE, Srinidhi S, Vaishnavi S, Shalini P, Priyadarshni VI. Dentition Status, Periodontal Status, Dentofacial Anomalies and Treatment Needs Among Differently Abled Children in Chennai. J Oral Health Comm Dent 2015; 9 (3):120-125.

DOI: 10.5005/johcd-9-3-120

License: CC BY-NC 3.0

Published Online: 01-09-2015

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2015; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

BACKGROUND

Oral health is an important aspect of health for all children, and is more important for children with special health needs.

AIM

The study was done to assess the dentition status, periodontal status, dentofacial anomalies and treatment needs of differently abled children attending special schools in Chennai.

MATERIALS AND METHOD

A cross sectional study was conducted among 6 - 18 year old hearing and speech impaired children and visually impaired children in Chennai. A cluster sampling methodology was followed for the selection of study subjects. The final sample size for the study was 624 hearing and speech impaired children and 506 visually impaired children. The data was collected using WHO Assessment Form (WHO 1997) modified. Statistical analysis was done using Pearson chi-square test and Student t test.

RESULTS

Overall mean dmft/DMFT among differently abled children was (0.58+1.46)/ (0.50+0.93). Dental caries experience was more among hearing and speech impaired children with mean dmft/DMFT being (0.67+1.44) / (0.52+0.95) and it was statistically significant(P<0.05) with visually impaired children in case of dmft. Overall mean DAI was (22.3+5.4)) and malocclusion was predominant among visually impaired children compared to hearing and speech impaired children and it was statistically significant (P<0.001) The periodontal conditions were poorer among visually impaired children with most of them having calculus and it was statistically significant (P<0.05) compared to hearing and speech impaired children. Traumatic injuries were seen more among visually impaired children compared to hearing and speech impaired children and it was statistically very highly significant (P<0.001). Hearing and speech impaired children needed more treatment than the visually impaired children with majority of them needing restorations.

CONCLUSION

It can be concluded from the study that even though the oral health status and treatment needs of differently abled children is not alarming, a prevention based intervention program directed especially towards dental caries and periodontal health is recommended for these special groups for a better productive life in future.


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