Journal of Oral Health and Community Dentistry

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VOLUME 16 , ISSUE 1 ( January-April, 2022 ) > List of Articles

ORIGINAL RESEARCH

Relevance of Bridge Course from Bachelor of Dental Surgery to Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery—Is it a Valid Option to Aid Improve Rural Healthcare Scenario in India? A Questionnaire Study

KK Vasupriya, Sneha Pendem, Gnanam Andavan

Keywords : Bridge course for Bachelor of Dental Surgery, Healthcare worker distribution, Indian healthcare system, Rural health care in India

Citation Information : Vasupriya K, Pendem S, Andavan G. Relevance of Bridge Course from Bachelor of Dental Surgery to Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery—Is it a Valid Option to Aid Improve Rural Healthcare Scenario in India? A Questionnaire Study. J Oral Health Comm Dent 2022; 16 (1):19-25.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10062-0129

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 27-04-2022

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2022; The Author(s).


Abstract

The current rural healthcare scenario in India is extremely fragile with most of the healthcare facilities, and healthcare workers concentrated in the metropolitan cities. Rural India that forms the backbone of the Indian economy and contributes to a major segment of Indian population even today lacks the basic healthcare needs. Lack of infrastructure, low income, and poor quality of life are major factors that contribute to nonequitable distribution of the healthcare workers. On the contrary, increasing number of unemployed dental graduates is on a constant raise that seems to be a threat to the developing society. Bridge course for dental graduates seems to be a viable option to overcome these issues. However, this is an arduous task considering the current dental educational curriculum and the rural healthcare needs. The aim of the current paper was to determine the relevance of bridge course and assess its applicability in the current healthcare system for equitable distribution of the healthcare workers in the country.


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